IEEE 2017-2018 Big Data Projects in Java

Abstract:

Microblog platforms have been extremely popular in the big data era due to its real-time diffusion of information. It’s important to know what anomalous events are trending on the social network and be able to monitor their evolution and find related anomalies. In this paper we demonstrate RING, a real-time emerging anomaly monitoring system over microblog text streams. RING integrates our efforts on both emerging anomaly monitoring research and system research. From the anomaly monitoring perspective, RING proposes a graph analytic approach such that (1) RING is able to detect emerging anomalies at an earlier stage compared to the existing methods, (2) RING is among the first to discover emerging anomalies correlations in a streaming fashion, (3) RING is able to monitor anomaly evolutions in real-time at different time scales from minutes to months. From the system research perspective, RING (1) optimizes time-ranged keyword query performance of a full-text search engine to improve the efficiency of monitoring anomaly evolution, (2) improves the dynamic graph processing performance of Spark and implements our graph stream model on it, As a result, RING is able to process big data to the entire Weibo or Twitter text stream with linear horizontal scalability. The system clearly presents its advantages over existing systems and methods from both the event monitoring perspective and the system perspective for the emerging event monitoring task.

Abstract:

Clustering techniques have been widely adopted in many real world data analysis applications, such as customer behavior analysis, targeted marketing, digital forensics, etc. With the explosion of data in today’s big data era, a major trend to handle a clustering over large-scale datasets is outsourcing it to public cloud platforms. This is because cloud computing offers not only reliable services with performance guarantees, but also savings on in-house IT infrastructures. However, as datasets used for clustering may contain sensitive information, e.g., patient health information, commercial data, and behavioral data, etc, directly outsourcing them to public cloud servers inevitably raise privacy concerns.

Abstract:

The new generations of mobile devices have high processing power and storage, but they lag behind in terms of software systems for big data storage and processing. Hadoop is a scalable platform that provides distributed storage and computational capabilities on clusters of commodity hardware. Building Hadoop on a mobile network enables the devices to run data intensive computing applications without direct knowledge of underlying distributed systems complexities. However, these applications have severe energy and reliability constraints (e.g., caused by unexpected device failures or topology changes in a dynamic network). As mobile devices are more susceptible to unauthorized access, when compared to traditional servers, security is also a concern for sensitive data. Hence, it is paramount to consider reliability, energy efficiency and security for such applications. The MDFS (Mobile Distributed File System) [1] addresses these issues for big data processing in mobile clouds. We have developed the Hadoop MapReduce framework over MDFS and have studied its performance by varying input workloads in a real heterogeneous mobile cluster. Our evaluation shows that the implementation addresses all constraints in processing large amounts of data in mobile clouds. Thus, our system is a viable solution to meet the growing demands of data processing in a mobile environment.

Abstract:

Traditional parallel algorithms for mining frequent itemsets aim to balance load by equally partitioning data among a group of computing nodes. We start this study by discovering a serious performance problem of the existing parallel Frequent Itemset Mining algorithms. Given a large dataset, data partitioning strategies in the existing solutions suffer high communication and mining overhead induced by redundant transactions transmitted among computing nodes. We address this problem by developing a data partitioning approach called FiDoop-DP using the MapReduce programming model. The overarching goal of FiDoop-DP is to boost the performance of parallel Frequent Itemset Mining on Hadoop clusters. At the heart of FiDoop-DP is the Voronoi diagram-based data partitioning technique, which exploits correlations among transactions. Incorporating the similarity metric and the Locality-Sensitive Hashing technique, FiDoop-DP places highly similar transactions into a data partition to improve locality without creating an excessive number of redundant transactions. We implement FiDoop-DP on a 24-node Hadoop cluster, driven by a wide range of datasets created by IBM Quest Market-Basket Synthetic Data Generator. Experimental results reveal that FiDoop-DP is conducive to reducing network and computing loads by the virtue of eliminating redundant transactions on Hadoop nodes. FiDoop-DP significantly improves the performance of the existing parallel frequent-pattern scheme by up to 31 percent with an average of 18 percent.

Abstract:

The advancements in computer systems and networks have created a new environment for criminal acts, widely known as cybercrime. Cybercrime incidents are occurrences of particular criminal offences that pose a serious threat to the global economy, safety, and well-being of society. This paper offers a comprehensive understanding of cybercrime incidents and their corresponding offences combining a series of approaches reported in relevant literature. Initially, this paper reviews and identifies the features of cybercrime incidents, their respective elements and proposes a combinatorial incident description schema. The schema provides the opportunity to systematically combine various elements--or cybercrime characteristics. Additionally, a comprehensive list of cybercrime-related offences is put forward. The offences are ordered in a two-level classification system based on specific criteria to assist in better classification and correlation of their respective incidents. This enables a thorough understanding of the repeating and underlying criminal activities. The proposed system can serve as a common reference overtaking obstacles deriving from misconceptions for cybercrimes with cross-border activities. The proposed schema can be extended with a list of recommended actions, corresponding measures and effective policies that match with the offence type and subsequently with a particular incident. This matching will enable better monitoring, handling and moderate cybercrime incident occurrences. The ultimate objective is to incorporate the schema-based description of cybercrime elements to a complete incident management system with standard operating procedures and protocols.

Abstract:

Secure data deduplication can significantly reduce the communication and storage overheads in cloud storage services, and has potential applications in our big data-driven society. Existing data deduplication schemes are generally designed to either resist brute-force attacks or ensure the efficiency and data availability, but not both conditions. We are also not aware of any existing scheme that achieves accountability, in the sense of reducing duplicate information disclosure (e.g., to determine whether plaintexts of two encrypted messages are identical). In this paper, we investigate a three-tier cross-domain architecture, and propose an efficient and privacy-preserving big data deduplication in cloud storage (hereafter referred to as EPCDD). EPCDD achieves both privacy-preserving and data availability, and resists brute-force attacks. In addition, we take accountability into consideration to offer better privacy assurances than existing schemes. We then demonstrate that EPCDD outperforms existing competing schemes, in terms of computation, communication and storage overheads. In addition, the time complexity of duplicate search in EPCDD is logarithmic.

Abstract:

With the globalization of service, organizations continuously produce large volumes of data that need to be analysed over geo-dispersed locations. Traditionally central approach that moving all data to a single cluster is inefficient or infeasible due to the limitations such as the scarcity of wide-area bandwidth and the low latency requirement of data processing. Processing big data across geo-distributed datacenters continues to gain popularity in recent years. However, managing distributed MapReduce computations across geo-distributed datacenters poses a number of technical challenges: how to allocate data among a selection of geo-distributed datacenters to reduce the communication cost, how to determine the Virtual Machine (VM) provisioning strategy that offers high performance and low cost, and what criteria should be used to select a datacenter as the final reducer for big data analytics jobs. In this paper, these challenges is addressed by balancing bandwidth cost, storage cost, computing cost, migration cost, and latency cost, between the two MapReduce phases across datacenters. We formulate this complex cost optimization problem for data movement, resource provisioning and reducer selection into a joint stochastic integer nonlinear optimization problem by minimizing the five cost factors simultaneously. The Lyapunov framework is integrated into our study and an efficient online algorithm that is able to minimize the long-term time-averaged operation cost is further designed. Theoretical analysis shows that our online algorithm can provide a near optimum solution with a provable gap and can guarantee that the data processing can be completed within pre-defined bounded delays. Experiments on WorldCup98 web site trace validate the theoretical analysis results and demonstrate that our approach is close to the offline-optimum performance and superior to some representative approaches.

Abstract:

With big data growth in biomedical and healthcare communities, accurate analysis of medical data benefits early disease detection, patient care, and community services. However, the analysis accuracy is reduced when the quality of medical data is incomplete. Moreover, different regions exhibit unique characteristics of certain regional diseases, which may weaken the prediction of disease outbreaks. In this paper, we streamline machine learning algorithms for effective prediction of chronic disease outbreak in disease-frequent communities. We experiment the modified prediction models over real-life hospital data collected from central China in 2013-2015. To overcome the difficulty of incomplete data, we use a latent factor model to reconstruct the missing data. We experiment on a regional chronic disease of cerebral infarction. We propose a new convolutional neural network (CNN)-based multimodal disease risk prediction algorithm using structured and unstructured data from hospital. To the best of our knowledge, none of the existing work focused on both data types in the area of medical big data analytics. Compared with several typical prediction algorithms, the prediction accuracy of our proposed algorithm reaches 94.8% with a convergence speed, which is faster than that of the CNN-based unimodal disease risk prediction algorithm.

Abstract:

The skyline operator has attracted considerable attention recently due to its broad applications. However, computing a skyline is challenging today since we have to deal with big data. For data-intensive applications, the MapReduce framework has been widely used recently. In this paper, we propose the efficient parallel algorithm SKY-MR+ for processing skyline queries using MapReduce. We first build a quadtree-based histogram for space partitioning by deciding whether to split each leaf node judiciously based on the benefit of splitting in terms of the estimated execution time. In addition, we apply the dominance power filtering method to effectively prune non-skyline points in advance. We next partition data based on the regions divided by the quadtree and compute candidate skyline points for each partition using MapReduce. Finally, we check whether each skyline candidate point is actually a skyline point in every partition using MapReduce. We also develop the workload balancing methods to make the estimated execution times of all available machines to be similar. We did experiments to compare SKY-MR+ with the state-of-the-art algorithms using MapReduce and confirmed the effectiveness as well as the scalability of SKY-MR+.

Abstract:

As one important technique of fuzzy clustering in data mining and pattern recognition, the possibilistic c-means algorithm (PCM) has been widely used in image analysis and knowledge discovery. However, it is difficult for PCM to produce a good result for clustering big data, especially for heterogenous data, since it is initially designed for only small structured dataset. To tackle this problem, the paper proposes a high-order PCM algorithm (HOPCM) for big data clustering by optimizing the objective function in the tensor space. Further, we design a distributed HOPCM method based on MapReduce for very large amounts of heterogeneous data. Finally, we devise a privacy-preserving HOPCM algorithm (PPHOPCM) to protect the private data on cloud by applying the BGV encryption scheme to HOPCM, In PPHOPCM, the functions for updating the membership matrix and clustering centers are approximated as polynomial functions to support the secure computing of the BGV scheme. Experimental results indicate that PPHOPCM can effectively cluster a large number of heterogeneous data using cloud computing without disclosure of private data.

Abstract:

The world is facing problems, such as uneven distribution of medical resources, the growing chronic diseases, and the increasing medical expenses. Blending the latest information technology into the healthcare system will greatly mitigate the problems. This paper presents the big health application system based on the health Internet of Things and big data. The system architecture, key technologies, and typical applications of big health system are introduced in detail.

Abstract:

Nowadays, there is an ever-increasing migration of people to urban areas. Health care service is one of the most challenging aspects that is greatly affected by the vast influx of people to city centers. Consequently, cities around the world are investing heavily in digital transformation in an effort to provide healthier ecosystems for people. In such a transformation, millions of homes are being equipped with smart devices (e.g., smart meters, sensors, and so on), which generate massive volumes of fine-grained and indexical data that can be analyzed to support smart city services. In this paper, we propose a model that utilizes smart home big data as a means of learning and discovering human activity patterns for health care applications. We propose the use of frequent pattern mining, cluster analysis, and prediction to measure and analyze energy usage changes sparked by occupants' behavior. Since people's habits are mostly identified by everyday routines, discovering these routines allows us to recognize anomalous activities that may indicate people's difficulties in taking care for themselves, such as not preparing food or not using a shower/bath. This paper addresses the need to analyze temporal energy consumption patterns at the appliance level, which is directly related to human activities. For the evaluation of the proposed mechanism, this paper uses the U.K. Domestic Appliance Level Electricity data set-time series data of power consumption collected from 2012 to 2015 with the time resolution of 6 s for five houses with 109 appliances from Southern England. The data from smart meters are recursively mined in the quantum/data slice of 24 h, and the results are maintained across successive mining exercises. The results of identifying human activity patterns from appliance usage are presented in detail in this paper along with the accuracy of shortand long-term predictions.

Abstract:

The functionality of modern multi-core processors is often driven by a given power budget that requires designers to evaluate different decision trade-offs, e.g., to choose between many slow, power-efficient cores, or fewer faster, power-hungry cores, or a combination of them. Here, we prototype and evaluate a new Hadoop scheduler, called DyScale, that exploits capabilities offered by heterogeneous cores within a single multi-core processor for achieving a variety of performance objectives. A typical MapReduce workload contains jobs with different performance goals: large, batch jobs that are throughput oriented, and smaller interactive jobs that are response time sensitive. Heterogeneous multi-core processors enable creating virtual resource pools based on “slow” and “fast” cores for multi-class priority scheduling. Since the same data can be accessed with either “slow” or “fast” slots, spare resources (slots) can be shared between different resource pools. Using measurements on an actual experimental setting and via simulation, we argue in favor of heterogeneous multi-core processors as they achieve “faster” (up to 40 percent) processing of small, interactive MapReduce jobs, while offering improved throughput (up to 40 percent) for large, batch jobs. We evaluate the performance benefits of DyScale versus the FIFO and Capacity job schedulers that are broadly used in the Hadoop community.

Abstract:

Data generation and publication on the Web has increased over the last years. This phenomenon, usually known as “Big Data”, poses new challenges related with Volume, Velocity, and Variety (“The three V's”) of data. The Semantic Web offers the means to deal with variety, where RDF (Resource Description Framework) is used to model data in the form of triples subject-predicate-object. In this way, it is possible to represent and interconnect RDF triples to build a true Web of Data. Nonetheless, a problem arises when big RDF collections must be stored, exchanges, and/or queried because the existing serialization formats are highly verbose, hence the remaining Big Semantic Data challenges (volume and variety) are aggravated when storing, exchanging, or querying big RDG collections. HDT addresses this issue by proposing a binary serialization format based on compact data structures that allows RDF to be compressed, but also to be queried without prior decompression. Thus, HDT reduces data volume and increases retrieval velocity. However, this achievement comes at the cost of and expensive RDF-to-HDT serialization in terms of computational resources and time. Therefore, HDT alleviates velocity and volume challenges for the end user, but moves Big Data challenges to the data publisher. In this work we show HDT-MR, a MapReduce-based algorithm that allows RDF datasets to be serialized to HDT in a distributed way, reducing processing resources and time, but also enabling larger datasets to be compressed.

Abstract:

Big sensing data is prevalent in both industry and scientific research applications where the data is generated with high volume and velocity. Cloud computing provides a promising platform for big sensing data processing and storage as it provides a flexible stack of massive computing, storage, and software services in a scalable manner. Current big sensing data processing on Cloud have adopted some data compression techniques. However, due to the high volume and velocity of big sensing data, traditional data compression techniques lack sufficient efficiency and scalability for data processing. Based on specific on-Cloud data compression requirements, we propose a novel scalable data compression approach based on calculating similarity among the partitioned data chunks. Instead of compressing basic data units, the compression will be conducted over partitioned data chunks. To restore original data sets, some restoration functions and predictions will be designed. MapReduce is used for algorithm implementation to achieve extra scalability on Cloud. With real world meteorological big sensing data experiments on U-Cloud platform, we demonstrate that the proposed scalable compression approach based on data chunk similarity can significantly improve data compression efficiency with affordable data accuracy loss.

Abstract:

In this paper, we propose an erasure-coded data archival system called aHDFS for Hadoop clusters, where RS(k+r,k) codes are employed to archive data replicas in the Hadoop distributed file system or HDFS. We develop two archival strategies (i.e., aHDFS-Grouping and aHDFS-Pipeline) in aHDFS to speed up the data archival process. aHDFS-Grouping - a MapReduce-based data archiving scheme - keeps each mapper’s intermediate output Key-Value pairs in a local key-value store. With the local store in place, aHDFS-Grouping merges all the intermediate key-value pairs with the same key into one single key-value pair, followed by shuffling the single Key-Value pair to reducers to generate final parity blocks. aHDFS-Pipeline forms a data archival pipeline using multiple data node in a Hadoop cluster. aHDFS-Pipeline delivers the merged single key-value pair to a subsequent node’s local key-value store. Last node in the pipeline is responsible for outputting parity blocks. We implement aHDFS in a real-world Hadoop cluster. The experimental results show that aHDFS-Grouping and aHDFS-Pipeline speed up Baseline’s shuffle and reduce phases by a factor of 10 and 5, respectively. When block size is larger than 32 MB, aHDFS improves the performance of HDFS-RAID and HDFS-EC by approximately 31.8 and 15.7 percent, respectively.