IEEE 2017-2018 Project Titles on POWER SYSTEMS

Abstract:

In some rural and sub-urban areas, the hosting capacity (HC) of low voltage networks is restricted by voltage limits. With local voltage control, photovoltaic generators can mitigate the voltage rise partly and, therefore, increase the HC. This paper investigates the effectiveness and general performance of different reactive and active power control concepts. It presents the findings of an extensive simulation-based investigation into the effectiveness of voltage rise mitigation, additional reactive power flows, network losses, and power curtailment. The two most common implementations of reactive power control have a similar effectiveness. The voltage rise can be compensated for by up to 25% and more than 60% for typical cable and overhead (OH) feeders, respectively. By additionally using active power curtailment of up to 3% of the annual yield, the HC can be increased by about 50% and 90% for the considered cable and OH feeder, respectively (purely rural feeders).

Abstract:

This paper proposes a control strategy for a three-phase three-wire thyristor-controlled LC -coupling hybrid active power filter (TCLC-HAPF), which can balance active power and compensate reactive power and harmonic currents under unbalanced loading. Compared with TCLC-HAPF with conventional control strategy, active power filters and hybrid active power filters which either fail to perform satisfactory compensation or require high-rating active inverter part for unbalanced compensation, a control strategy was proposed for TCLC-HAPF to operate with a small rating active inverter part for a variety of loads with satisfactory performance. The control idea is to provide different firing angles for each phase of the thyristor-controlled LC-coupling part (TCLC) to balance active power and compensate reactive power, while the active inverter part aims to compensate harmonic currents. First, the required different TCLC impedances are deduced. Then, independent firing angles referenced to the phase angle of voltage across TCLC are calculated. After angle transformations, final firing angles referenced to phase angle of load voltages are obtained. In this paper, a novel controller for TCLC-HAPF under unbalanced loading is proposed. Simulation and experimental results are provided to verify the effectiveness of the proposed controller in comparison with a state-of-the-art controller.

Abstract:

This paper introduces a cascaded H-bridge multilevel converter (CHB-MC)-based StatCom system that is able to operate with extremely low dc capacitance values. The theoretical limit is calculated for the maximum capacitor voltage ripple, and hence minimum dc capacitance values that can be used in the converter. The proposed low-capacitance StatCom (LC-StatCom) is able to operate with large capacitor voltage ripples, which are very close to the calculated theoretical maximum voltage ripple. The maximum voltage stress on the semiconductors in the LC -StatCom is lower than in a conventional StatCom system. The variable cluster voltage magnitude in the LC-StatCom system drops well below the maximum grid voltage, which allows a fixed maximum voltage on the individual capacitors. It is demonstrated that the proposed LC-StatCom has an asymmetric V-I characteristic, which is especially suited for operation as a reactive power source within the capacitive region. A high-bandwidth control system is designed for the proposed StatCom to provide control of the capacitor voltages during highly dynamic transient events. The proposed LC-StatCom system is experimentally verified on a low-voltage seven-level CHB-MC prototype. The experimental results show successful operation of the system with ripples as high as 90% of the nominal dc voltage. The required energy storage for the LC-StatCom system shows significant reduction compared to a conventional StatCom design.

Abstract:

The growing installation of distributed generation (DG) units in low-voltage distribution systems has popularized the concept of nonlinear load harmonic current compensation using multifunctional DG interfacing converters. It is analyzed in this paper that the compensation of local load harmonic current using a single DG interfacing converter may cause the amplification of supply voltage harmonics to sensitive loads, particularly when the main grid voltage is highly distorted. To address this limitation, unlike the operation of conventional unified power quality conditioners with series converter, a new simultaneous supply voltage and grid current harmonic compensation strategy is proposed using coordinated control of two shunt interfacing converters. Specifically, the first converter is responsible for local load supply voltage harmonic suppression. The second converter is used to mitigate the harmonic current produced by the interaction between the first interfacing converter and the local nonlinear load. To realize a simple control of parallel converters, a modified hybrid voltage and current controller is also developed in the paper. By using this proposed controller, the grid voltage phase-locked loop and the detection of the load current and the supply voltage harmonics are unnecessary for both interfacing converters. Thus, the computational load of interfacing converters can be significantly reduced. Simulated and experimental results are captured to validate the performance of the proposed topology and the control strategy.

Abstract:

The undesirable harmonic distortion produced by distributed generation units (DGUs) based on power-electronic inverters presents operating and power-quality challenges in electric systems. The level of distortion depends on the internal elements of the DGUs as well as on the characteristics of the grid, loads, and controls, among others. This paper presents a comprehensive method, focused on power-quality indexes and efficiency for the design of microgrids with multiple DGUs interconnected to the ac grid through three-phase multi-Megawatt medium-voltage pulsewidth-modulated-voltage-source inverters (PWM-VSI). The proposed design method is based on a least square solution using the harmonic domain modeling approach to effectively consider explicitly the harmonic characteristics of the DGUs and their direct and cross-coupling interaction with the grid, loads, and the other DGUs. Extensive simulations and analyses against PSCAD are presented in order to show the outstanding performance of the proposed design approach.

Abstract:

This paper deals with modeling and control of smart loads for demand-response management under increased penetration of renewable power generations (RPGs) at distribution level. The increased penetration of RPGs, particularly wind energy at distribution level, is associated with adverse impact on voltage quality. A permanent magnet synchronous generator based variable speed wind energy conversion system is modeled with a wind speed considering stochastic and periodic effects. The emulated wind power into the distribution system produces stochastic and periodic power variations. For the load demand response management, full-bridge self-commutated switches based converters are employed to control smart loads (SLs). These SLs are controlled for participating in grid bus voltage regulation and flickers mitigation. From various case studies, it is found that SLs are effective in improving the voltage profiles of the test feeder.

Abstract:

Voltage sag is one of the most frequent power quality problems found in industries and power system. Its effects can be numerous such as control equipment trips, process shutdown, production losses. This paper reports three year of voltage sag measurements collected in a research lab. This site is located near to many metal industries which lead to a correlation between the obtained results and possible voltage sags in these industries. From the result analysis, propositions of usage of single-phase voltage sag compensators in three-phase systems aiming a cost-effective mitigation are discussed.

Abstract:

This study examines the use of superconducting magnetic and battery hybrid energy storage to compensate grid voltage fluctuations. The superconducting magnetic energy storage system (SMES) has been emulated by a high-current inductor to investigate a system employing both SMES and battery energy storage experimentally. The design of the laboratory prototype is described in detail, which consists of a series-connected three phase voltage source inverter used to regulate ac voltage, and two bidirectional dc/dc converters used to control energy storage system charge and discharge. “DC bus level signaling” and “voltage droop control” have been used to automatically control power from the magnetic energy storage system during short-duration, high-power voltage sags, while the battery is used to provide power during longer term, low-power undervoltages. Energy storage system hybridization is shown to be advantageous by reducing battery peak power demand compared with a battery-only system, and by improving long-term voltage support capability compared with an SMES-only system. Consequently, the SMES/battery hybrid dynamic voltage restorer can support both short-term high-power voltage sags and long-term undervoltages with significantly reduced superconducting material cost compared with an SMES-based system.

Abstract:

This paper presents time-varying and constant switching frequency based sliding-mode control (SMC) methods for three-phase transformerless dynamic voltage restorers (TDVRs) which employ half-bridge voltage source inverter. An equation is derived for the time-varying switching frequency. However, since the time-varying switching frequency is not desired in practice, a smoothing operation is applied to the sliding surface function within a narrow boundary layer with the aim of eliminating the chattering effect and achieving a constant switching frequency operation. The control signal obtained from the smoothing operation is compared with a triangular carrier signal to produce the pulse width modulation signals. The feasibility of both SMC methods has been validated by experimental results obtained from a TDVR operating under highly distorted grid voltages and voltage sags. The results obtained from both methods show excellent performance in terms of dynamic response and low total harmonic distortion (THD) in the load voltage. However, the constant switching frequency-based SMC method not only offers a constant switching frequency at all times and preserves the inherent advantages of the SMC, but also leads to smaller THD in the load voltage than that of time-varying switching frequency-based SMC method.

Abstract:

This paper proposes a multilevel series compensator (MSC) to deal with voltage sags/swells, harmonic compensation, or reactive power compensation. Such a device can be considered as a dynamic voltage restorer or a series active power filter (Series-APF). The MSC can improve the power quality of loads located in stiff systems. The configuration is based on three-phase bridge (TPB) converters connected by means of cascaded single-phase transformers. This arrangement permits the use of a single dc-link. A generalization for K -stages in which K -transformers are coupled with K-TPB converters is presented. The topology permits generating a high number of levels in the voltage waveforms with a low number of power switches in comparison with a classic topology. The multilevel waveforms are generated by the converters through a suitable pulsewidth modulation (PWM) strategy that takes into consideration the transformer turns ratios. Modularity and simple maintenance make the proposed MSC an attractive solution compared with some conventional configurations. Model, PWM strategy, and overall control are discussed in this paper. Simulation and experimental results are presented as well.

Abstract:

A comprehensive control of a wind turbine system connected to an industrial plant is discussed in this paper, where an algorithm has been developed allowing a control structure that utilizes a four-leg inverter connected to the grid side to inject the available energy, as well as to work as an active power filter mitigating load current disturbances and enhancing power quality. A four-wire system is considered with three-phase and single-phase linear and nonlinear loads. During the connection of the wind turbine, the utility-side controller is designed to compensate the disturbances caused in presence of reactive, nonlinear, and/or unbalanced single- and intra-phase loads, in addition to providing active and reactive power as required. When there is no wind power available, the controller is intended to improve the power quality using the dc-link capacitor with the power converter attached to the grid. The main difference of the proposed methodology with respect to others in the literature is that the proposed control structure is based on the conservative power theory decompositions. This choice provides decoupled power and current references for the inverter control, offering very flexible, selective, and powerful functionalities. Real-time software benchmarking has been conducted in order to evaluate the performance of the proposed control algorithm for full real-time implementation. The control methodology is implemented and validated in hardware-in-the-loop based on the real time simulator “Opal-RT” and a TMSF28335 DSP microcontroller. The results corroborated our power quality enhancement control and allowed to exclude passive filters, contributing to a more compact, flexible, and reliable electronic implementation of a smart-grid based control.

Abstract:

This paper presents a voltage-controlled DSTATCOM-based voltage regulator for low voltage distribution grids. The voltage regulator is designed to temporarily meet the grid code, postponing unplanned investments while a definitive solution could be planned to solve regulation issues. The power stage is composed of a three-phase four-wire Voltage Source Inverter (VSI) and a second order low-pass filter. The control strategy has three output voltage loops with active damping and two dc bus voltage loops. In addition, two loops are included to the proposed control strategy: the concept of Minimum Power Point Tracking (mPPT) and the frequency loop. The mPPT allows the voltage regulator to operate at the Minimum Power Point (mPP), avoiding the circulation of unnecessary reactive compensation. The frequency loop allows the voltage regulator to be independent of the grid voltage information, especially the grid angle, using only the information available at the Point of Common Coupling (PCC). Experimental results show the regulation capacity, the features of the mPPT algorithm for linear and nonlinear loads and the frequency stability.

Abstract:

Rising demand for distributed generation based on Renewable Energy Sources (RES) has led to several issues in the operation of utility grids. The microgrid is a promising solution to solve these problems. A dedicated energy storage system could contribute to a better integration of RES into the microgrid by smoothing the renewable resource's intermittency, improving the quality of the injected power and enabling additional services like voltage and frequency regulation. However, due to energy/power technological limitations, it is often necessary to use Hybrid Energy Storage Systems (HESS). In this paper, a second order sliding mode controller is proposed for the power flow control of a HESS, using a Four Leg Three Level Neutral Point Clamped (4-Leg 3L-NPC) inverter as the only interface between the RES/HESS and the microgrid. A three-dimensional space vector modulation and a sequence decomposition based AC side control allows the inverter to work in unbalanced load conditions while maintaining a balanced AC voltage at the point of common coupling. DC current harmonics caused by unbalanced load and the NPC floating middle point voltage, together with the power division limits are carefully addressed in this paper. The effectiveness of the proposed technique for the HESS power flow control is compared to a classical PI control scheme and is proven through simulations and experimentally using a 4 Leg 3LNPC prototype on a test bench.

Abstract:

This paper deals with the deployment of a local three-phase four-wire (3P4W) electrical power distribution system (EPDS), using a single- to three-phase unified power quality conditioner (UPQC) topology, called UPQC-1Ph-to-3Ph. The topology is indicated for applications in rural or remote areas in which, for economic reasons, only EPDS with single wire earth return are accessible to the consumer. Since the use of three-phase loads is increasing in these areas, access to a three-phase distribution system becomes preponderant. By adopting a dual compensation strategy, the proposed UPQC-1Ph-to-3Ph is capable of draining from the single-phase electrical grid a sinusoidal current and in phase with the voltage, resulting a high power factor. Furthermore, the system is also able to suppress grid voltage harmonics, as well as to compensate for other disturbances, such as voltage sags. Thus, a 3P4W system with regulated, balanced and sinusoidal voltages with low harmonic contents is provided for single- and three-phase loads. An analysis of the power flow through the series and parallel converters is performed in order to aid the designing of the power converters. Experimental results are presented for validating the proposal, as well as evaluating the static and dynamic performances of the proposed topology.